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Bandizip Is Probably The Best Free File Archiver Right Now | Ghacks Technology News

bandizip The application is available as a portable version or setup for Windows as well as a (paid) version for Apple's Macintosh system. If you install the program on Windows, the file association settings page is opened right afterwards. Here you can associate archive file formats to open with the application. Doing so will replace the icon of associated archives with the Bandizip icon. It also allows you to double-click the archive to run an action configured in Bandizip on it. One interesting feature of the application is the ability to change what happens when you double-click archives. The default action is to open Bandizip to display the contents of the archive. You can change that however so that the archive gets extracted automatically for instance instead. As far as customizations go, there are quite a few that make life easier for you. Here is a short list: Configure what is displayed in the context menu and what is not.

Original article here: http://www.ghacks.net/2014/06/24/bandizip-probably-best-free-file-archiver-right-now/

7-Zip (64-bit version) | PCWorld

In fact, 7-Zip is the official reference implementation for the 7z format, and since it is open source, the format specification is distributed right within the source code. To test it, I used a folder with 65MB of easily-compressed documents such as DOC, XLS, and BMP files; it also contained a few small blog ZIP files for good measure. Zipped using Windows Explorer, the folder compressed to 8,881KB. 7-Zip compressed the same exact folder down to 6,036KB, shaving almost 3MB off the archive. Thats a difference of more than 25%--phenomenal, really, when you consider ZIPs market dominance. Speaking of market dominance, thats another key difference between the 7z and ZIP formats. Windows Explorer has been handling ZIP files like folders for years, and most people recognize them instantly and work with them all the time. But send someone a .7Z file, and they may not know what to do with it--in fact, they may not even realize its a compressed file. Note that I call it a difference rather than a disadvantage: These days, many email providers (including Gmail) snoop into any ZIP file you send, and if it contains executable files, simply dont let you send it. Compress your executables using 7-Zip, and you can email them to anyone you like.

Original article here: http://www.pcworld.com/article/232451/7zip_64bit_version.html

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